So far, our Community Appeal has raised
£25,651
With every pound matched by The Roddick Foundation

Build our future. Imagine our past. Be there.

We are refurbishing our Corn Exchange and Studio Theatre to improve your experiences at our groundbreaking events. Along with restoring long-lost heritage features, we are also building a dedicated creative space, a delightful street-facing café and public spaces where you can relax and enjoy the iconic architecture at the heart of our city.

With over 90% of funding in place, help us go all the way.

Graduations, tea dances, roller derbies, pop icons, Suffragette protests, cutting-edge art, silent discos, hairdressing championships, tear-jerking theatre, fierce debates and Eurovision winners. We’ve seen it all.

Once a playground for the Prince Regent, Brighton Dome is now the most dynamic performance venue and arts charity in the South East, who also produce the coveted Brighton Festival each May.

Your support will enable us to protect our rich heritage and continue to enrich the lives of our community.

The Prince Regent commissioned William Porden to create Brighton Dome as his grand riding house and stables. Building began in 1803. The prince is infamous for the many secret passageways he built out of his palace, now The Royal Pavilion, including one that leads to Brighton Dome that
you can still visit today.

October 1937 Brighton Dome appears in the first feature film to be set in Brighton. The film was set in 1872 which explains the Victorian style of transport and costume.

The Royal Pavilion Estate was used as a military hospital during WWI and treated over 4,000 Indian soldiers. When revealing the original features of the Corn Exchange our builders found letters and other memorabilia hidden in the walls.

Early jazz pioneers, the Southern Syncopated Orchestra, played at Brighton Dome in 1921. Tragically, that same year, many of its members were lost in a fatal shipping accident between Glasgow and Derry.

11th July 1935 our Corn Exchange played host to a wrestling tournament, the highlight of which was a fiercely contested bout between Francis ‘the Cornish Wonder’ Gregory and John ‘Italian’ Devalto. In stark contrast to the vicious brawls that were common, the reporter notes that, ‘much cleaner tactics were used’ with crowd favourite Gregory taking an early lead.

Installed in 1936 our tailor-made Hill, Norman & Beard dual-purpose concert organ is still in use today. Most famously played by ‘Wonder Boy Organist’ Douglas Reeve. He played during air raids, and once famously continued his concert after a bomb landed on the nearby Royal Pavilion lawns. credit to FA Hare, Leeds - From the collection of Terry Beatty

"It was over all too quickly, but this was it: I knew there was another life, another world because I'd seen it, here in Brighton Dome. It wasn't just about Bowie, it was the realisation that you could step outside of stifling conformity, normality and find that other world for yourself. It was just Bowie who lit the way for me and innumerable others." Melita Dennett experiencing David Bowie in 1973

Brighton Dome has a year round programme that engages with 1 in 3.5 houses in our city. Over 17,000 people participate in our Creative Learning activities and events annually. We also have 80 conference and private events each year.

Transformed in Art Deco style in the 1930s, the venue has since been a performing arts venue and space for hire, seeing everything from contemporary dance to weddings, community fayres to film festivals, cutting-edge theatre to Brighton Albion football team parties.

We invited Brighton Roller Derby team Brighton Rockers to tear up the floor shortly before we closed for the redevelopment. During Victorian times the Corn Exchange was used as a skating rink and for women's football roller skating!

We are a registered charity and 69% of our income is self-generated. Memberships, donations, trusts and foundations account for 5% with the remaining 64% earned from ticket sales, catering, private events and sponsorship. 31% of our income is received from our public funders Arts Council England and Brighton & Hove City Council.

Get involved, your way

With 90% funding in place, you can help us go all the way...